Secret 150 JIM ROHN

Jim Rohn

17 September 1930 – 5 December 2009

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For every disciplined effort there are multiple rewards…

– Jim Rohn

Biography

Jim Rohn helped people sculpt life strategies that expanded their imagination of what is possible. He is widely regarded as one of the most influential thinkers of our time.

Born to an Idaho farming family in the mid-1900s, Jim was ingrained with a work ethic that served him well throughout his life. At 25, he met his mentor Earl Shoaff. And over the next six years he made his first fortune, yet didn’t get into speaking until he moved to Beverly Hills, Calif., when a friend at the Rotary Club asked him to tell his success story, which Rohn titled “Idaho Farm Boy Makes It to Beverly Hills.” His speech went over so well that he received more invitations to share it, and better yet, they started paying him for it. In the beginning, he spoke in front of college and high-school classes and at service clubs, before moving on to seminars in 1963, which launched him into the personal-development business. From then on, he became a trailblazer in the self-help/personal-development industry, impacting the lives of millions through his life-changing material.

Jim focused on the fundamentals of human behaviour that most affect personal and business performance. His is the standard to which those who seek to teach and inspire others are compared. He possessed the unique ability to bring extraordinary insights to ordinary principles and events, and the combination of his substance and style still captures the imagination of those who hear or read his words.

He authored countless books and audio and video programs, and helped motivate and shape an entire generation of personal-development trainers and hundreds of executives from America’s top corporations.

About Quote

For every disciplined effort, there are multiple rewards is an extension of the Biblical law that says that if you sow well, you will reap well. Not only does it suggest that we’ll all reap what we’ve sown, it also suggests that we’ll reap much more. Life is full of laws that both govern and explain behaviours, but this may well be the major law we need to understand: for every disciplined effort, there are multiple rewards.

If you’re fair and honest and patient with others, your reward will be multiplied. If you give more than you expect to receive, your reward is more than you expect. But remember: the key word here is discipline. Everything of value requires care, attention, and discipline. Our thoughts require discipline. We must consistently determine our inner boundaries and our codes of conduct, or our thoughts will be confused. And if our thoughts are confused, we will become hopelessly lost in the maze of life. Confused thoughts produce confused results.

Remember the law: “For every disciplined effort, there are multiple rewards.” Learn the discipline of writing a card or a letter to a friend. Learn the discipline of paying your bills on time, arriving to appointments on time, or using your time more effectively. Learn the discipline of paying attention, or paying your taxes or paying yourself. Learn the discipline of having regular meetings with your associates, or your spouse, or your child, or your parent. Learn the discipline of learning all you can learn, of teaching all you can teach, of reading all you can read.

The only missing ingredient to your incredible success story in the future is a new and self-imposed discipline that will make you try harder and work more intensely than you ever thought you could. The most valuable form of discipline is the one that you impose upon yourself. Don’t wait for things to deteriorate so drastically that someone else must impose discipline in your life.

Etymology

Discipline

Discipline dates back to the 13th century and took its meaning from the Old French word descepline “physical punishment, teaching,” and from Latin disciplina : “instruction given, teaching, learning, knowledge”. The militaristic meaning “orderly conduct as a result of training” comes from about 1500.

Effort

Effort dates back to the 15th century and takes it meaning from the Middle French word effort "laborious attempt, strenuous exertion", from the Old French esforz "force, impetuosity, strength, power," and from Vulgar Latin *exfortiare "to show strength"

Multiple

From the Late Latin word multiplus “many folds”

Reward

From the late 14th Century rewarder “ repayment for some service”

References